Friday, January 29, 2016

Final Thoughts

The biggest highlight of this semester in drawing and painting was how much I learned and improved from this class. I went into this class thinking that it would not be too hard for me and that I would not be very good at it. Turns out I was very wrong. This class pushed me to do better and really show me that I am not as bad as I think. I learned so much from this class and it has helped me improve a lot. I look back at what I knew coming into this class (which was very little) and now I know so much. This was a very fun class even though it was very challenging for me. However, the outcome of each assignment was always a surprise to me because I was so proud of myself for what I had accomplished. I was very surprised of the improvement I made from the self-portraits. The final portrait was so much better than what I came to the class on the first day. Another highlight from this semester of drawing and painting is when I completed my unsung hero project. This was a highlight for me because I took the project into a different turn. I really wanted to make my artwork standout and be different from everyone else's. So that is when I decided to cut my work into a bowl shape and not have a normal square cutout. In the end of the project I was very proud of myself for finishing it and making it unique. 


Work of Art that I am the most proud of

One of my favorite artworks that I did and most proud of is the colored pencil artwork. I felt that I really took my time to get as much detail as possible. I learned from color pencil that it is not as easy as people think it is to color with colored pencil. It is very difficult to blend the colored pencils together. I also learned that I can not just pick a photo to draw from because I think it is the easiest because in the end it might end up being a really hard photo to draw. However, it taught me to push myself to do my best and really focus on every inch of detail in the photo to make it realistic. I learned what the white colored pencil does while completing a colored pencil drawing. I always wondered why there was a white color pencil because you can not see it on white paper. I found out that it is a really good tool to use for blending the colored pencils together. Another thing I learned, is more about detail because this assignment made me take the photo I was drawing from and focus on one section of the picture at a time. 

Watercolor Techniques

Purpose:

  • To experiment and learn a variety of watercolor techniques 


I learned many concepts from the watercolor practice techniques. One of the most important concepts that I learned was that there was more difficultly to adding details to a watercolor painting than I thought. You needed to make sure that you had a background and a simple outline of the object you were going to be creating before you start adding detail. I also learned that you can not start off dark with the watercolor but you start off light because it is much easier to fix or change the color. The watercolor practice techniques also taught me how to blend the colors more and how to really use them to make different shades. 

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Perspective Drawing Strategies

Purpose:
To understand what perspective means in Art;
To learn and apply various perspective strategies through the creation of drawings.

1. The first assignment that I completed was the one-point perspective drawing. For this assignment I had some challenges. One of the challenges that I had was when I was creating the skylight. When creating the skylight I had a challenge trying to make it look like it was in perspective. The back part of the skylight always seemed to look off to me so I kept trying and trying to get it correct. The other piece that I found challenging to draw was the book case. The part about the book shelf was when I was drawing the shelves into perspective. I had to figure out what points were drawn to the point of perspective and what points were simply just drawn vertically straight. To figure out how to draw the skylight and the bookcase I looked at multiple videos on how to draw a simple bookcase and skylight until I really understood how to draw it.The next assignment was the two point perspective. One of the challenges that I had for this assignment was when I was drawing the doors to the buildings. I had to figure out what parts of the inside of the door that I could see if I was viewing that door from that perspective. I was able to figure out what parts of the door I could see by imagining myself looking at a door from that perspective and how much of it I would see. The last assignment that we completed was our final perspective drawing. This assignment was the hardest one for me but the most exciting because I was drawing an object that was out of the ordinary and not just lines like the perspective drawings. The two challenges that I had on this assignment was where to put my point of perspective and how to draw glass. I needed to find the point of perspective to align the bottles into a straight line. To be able to do this I took a big piece of white paper and my photo that I was drawing from a drew and drew the point that they aligned on the paper. I then took my drawing paper and taped it down. I drew a soft line of where the bottle caps should be aligned. The most challenging thing on this assignment was drawing the glass. I was able to draw the glass by really looking at the variety of colors inside. In the end the drawing and colors came together. The first assignment that I completed was the one-point perspective drawing. For this assignment I had some challenges. One of the challenges that I had was when I was creating the skylight. When creating the skylight I had a challenge trying to make it look like it was in perspective. The back part of the skylight always seemed to look off to me so I kept trying and trying to get it correct. The other piece that I found challenging to draw was the book case. The part about the book shelf was when I was drawing the shelves into perspective. I had to figure out what points were drawn to the point of perspective and what points were simply just drawn vertically straight. To figure out how to draw the skylight and the bookcase I looked at multiple videos on how to draw a simple bookcase and skylight until I really understood how to draw it.The next assignment was the two point perspective. One of the challenges that I had for this assignment was when I was drawing the doors to the buildings. I had to figure out what parts of the inside of the door that I could see if I was viewing that door from that perspective. I was able to figure out what parts of the door I could see by imagining myself looking at a door from that perspective and how much of it I would see. The last assignment that we completed was our final perspective drawing. This assignment was the hardest one for me but the most exciting because I was drawing an object that was out of the ordinary and not just lines like the perspective drawings. The two challenges that I had on this assignment was where to put my point of perspective and how to draw glass. I needed to find the point of perspective to align the bottles into a straight line. To be able to do this I took a big piece of white paper and my photo that I was drawing from a drew and drew the point that they aligned on the paper. I then took my drawing paper and taped it down. I drew a soft line of where the bottle caps should be aligned. The most challenging thing on this assignment was drawing the glass. I was able to draw the glass by really looking at the variety of colors inside. In the end the drawing and colors came together.

2. During all of these exercises I learned a lot. One of the things that I learned as a result of doing these exercises was perspective and proportion. When drawing landscape or any perspective drawing you have to make sure everything makes sense. Meaning the closest object in your drawing should be the biggest and most detailed because you are able to see the details clearer because they are closer to your eyes. The farthest object should be the smallest and less detailed. When you are drawing a perspective drawing or landscape you have to make sure everything is in perspective. Meaning you have to think about how you would see that object if it were in front of you and how much of that object you would see. Another thing I learned was how to work with colored pencils. I learned how to blend colors together. I was always curious of why there was white colored pencil because you could never see it on a white piece of paper. I learned it was great for blending colors and making certain areas lighter than others. The last thing that I learned was having to be patient. It takes a long time to really look at the colors of the photo you are drawing from. When I was stuck trying to draw the glass of the bottles I had to pay attention to all the colors that were viewed. In the end the colors came together and made it look like glass. I learned how to draw “bokeh”. You had to focus on the colors and not details because you could not see those details, all you could see was the colors.


Atmospheric Perspective


Two Point Perspective 

One-Point Perspective

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Watercolor History

Purpose:
  • To become familiar with the history of watercolor;
  • To become familiar with various watercolor artists throughout time;
  • To make connections between watercolor purposes and techniques from long ago to its uses today.

1. Watercolor came to the West in the late 1400s. In the 18th century, the first paint manufacturer was set up in European cities. Artists would have to create their own watercolors. They had to prepare and grin their own watercolor paint. The paint came in dry clumps that were cut off like clay slabs (meaning the paints were hard). However, watercolors can be traced back to cave paintings in 10,000 B.C. They can also be traced back to Ancient Egyptians who used to paint on their tombs and temples. But, if we look at the more modern definition of watercolors it appeared in the Far and Middle East by Chinese and Japanese artists on their handmade silks and papers.

2. Albrecht Durer is considered the father of modern watercolor painting. He mastered the watercolor techniques. He traveled to Italy in 1949 to 1945 for landscape paintings. There he viewed many scenes . Durer worked with nature most of the time and painted many animals. He focused more on the actual/local colors of his subjects instead of making up color schemes, like the other artists in his time. When he painted the shape first and then added details and highlights.
Albrecht Durer, ‘Wing of a Roller’ 1512


Anthony Van Dyck painted landscapes in watercolor. He stayed in England and there he painted many landscapes in watercolor. Those painyins were used as studies and backgrounds for his oil paintings and portraits he later painted. He introduced the watercolor landscape traditions to England.He died in 1641 in England. He used the clear watercolor washes which allowed the blank paper to give the pigment a shine. Since Dyck, artists have  viewed their watercolor paintings as an interaction between color and paper.


                                       
Anthony Van Dyck, ‘Landscape’ 1632


3. Claude Lorraine also painted large landscapes. He was born in 1600 and then later died in 1682. He painted hers in Rome where they were commissioned by the kings and clergy. Some have said that he is the best landscape artist in the world. He mixed her colors with freshness, shadow and light. Lorraine's oil landscapes required many wash drawings before they were completed. He was a french painter, printer and art theorist. He is said to be the first artist to paint the first modern abstract works. 

Claude Lorraine ‘Landscape with River, View of the Tiber from Monte Mario, Rome’ 
British Museum, London


Fredric Remington was born in 1861 in Canton, New York. He is considered one of the greatest western painters, sculptors and illustrators of his time. He died in 1909 at his home studio in New Rochelle, New York from an appendicitis attack. During the Spanish-American war he was working under William Randolph Hearst for New York Journal as a war journalist.

Fredric Remington"The Couriers" (1885)

4. European artists used watercolors to decorate manuscripts and to color maps int eh Middle Ages and to make studies from nature and portrait miniatures during the Renaissance. Watercolor was used in drawings in the 1700s for landscape drawings. Some artists began to use firm outlines and pale hues for a more painterly effect. In the 100s there was a freer brushwork that captured a more atmospheric effects. Some artists used bright colors for architectural subjects. Today, the medium is used with Britain.  Artists had to produce their own paints. In 1780, the artists dipped a cake in water and rubbed it on to a shell. Then in the 1830s, artists could buy the moist watercolors in porcelain pans. Then in 1846, watercolors grew and Winsor and Newton introduced moist watercolors in metal tubs. Then in the 19th century there was something called gouache that was white and used as a wash. Another supply that was used with watercolors was paintboxes. In 1731, there were instructions for making a pocket-sized ivory case with compartments for thirty-two colors, crayon and compasses. After that there were already made boxes for the artists. They were constructed of mahogany, fitted with brass hardware and leather linings. Those boxes already contained porcelain mixing pans, wash bowls, storage tins for chalk, charcoal, trays for brushes, scrapers, blocks of ink, and colors. Then there was a paintbox called the "Shilling color box" that was the same but had pan colors and compartments for mixing and separate water vessels. Next, the supplies that were used were brushed and other tools. The hair of the Russian stable is where the brushes were made out of.  It held a large amount of color and flexes on paper. The hands of the brush were made from quills and then metal-ferruled wooden shafts. Besides the tools to make the paint and to get paint to paper, you need the actual paper. The paper was made with w00l by using parallel laid lines and caused wet watercolor washes to pool. Then in 1767 there was a wove ready sized with gelatin paper. Then in 1850, a man named Whatman offered papers with three surfaces; hot pressed, cold pressed and unpressed. Lastly, John William North offered linen board.



Bibliography: 
"History of Watercolor: Whereforth It Came - WatercolorPainting.com."WatercolorPaintingcom. N.p., 14 Sept. 2015. Web. 07 Jan. 2016.
"History-Overview." Watercolor Watercolor Painting Watermedia History Contemporary Exhibitions. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Jan. 2016.
"Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History." Watercolor Painting in Britain, 1750–1850. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Jan. 2016.








Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Cecil Jackson-Cole, Unsung Hero

     

    I chose Cecil Jackson-Cole as my unsung hero. I did not choose someone from the list that was provided on the Lowell Milken Center’s page because I wanted to be unique and also bring attention to someone else who has made an impact on the world. There are so many people in the world that do great things everyday that will or have already impacted us. The unfortunate part is that many of us do not know who did that thing that impacted us. Little by little we can start to find out who those people were and express them to the world. That is what I am doing with Cecil Jackson-Cole. I am taking someone that has little to no recognition at all and brining more attention to them. These little gestures can lead to a big gesture but the whole world has to start doing it as well.
     Cecil Jackson-Cole began as a manger in a furniture, which did not work out well so he started to think of what he could do to change the world. He established the first charity shop in the United Kingdom with the opening of the OxFam shop. Oxfam is an international organization with seventeen organizations within it that help ninety-four countries worldwide with poverty. Another big thing that he did, which my artwork focuses on is Act!onaid. Act!onaid is an international, non-governmental organization whose primary aim is to work against poverty and injustice worldwide and specifically towards children. The reason I chose to do something with Act!onaid is because it is his less known organizations that helps a great deal around the world. 
     My artwork has a ton of significance to it. I began by cutting my big square piece into the outline of Cecil Jackson-Cole and the world. I really wanted the viewer to focus on the main subject and not the background. So I ended up just cutting the entire background out to give it a uniqueness to it. The man that is holding the world is Cecil Jackson-Cole. The reason that I had him holding the world is because he is the one that founded Act!onaid and was the number on supporter from the start. Then I added a big red ribbon around the world to emphasis what organization I was painting for. The ribbon is also representing the big help that Act!onaid gives and how it holds up our world in a way. Without organizations like Act!onaid, then what would happen to those children that could not feed themselves? I painted the ribbon red to make it stand out in my artwork. To represent the hunger problem that these children had, I drew the hands reaching up to Cecil Jackson-Cole a littler skinnier than normal. Not only does the hands reaching up to Cecil Jackson-Cole represent the hunger but how he was an idol in their eyes. I chose to paint the hands black at first, because this organization began when he helped communities in India and Kenya and sponsored those children as well. I then thought that hunger just does not effect Kenya but the whole world. Because of that I added a variety of colored hands to represent the many races in our culture. 
     The last thought process that I had was if I was going to use bright colors or dark colors. In my painting I did a little bit of both. I started off with painting the world a bright blue and a bright green because I wanted to show what the people in our world view it as. People view our world as this great big happy place. They do not realize what goes on in the world inside. I represent that by splitting the world in half and making it look cut open. To make the viewer open their eyes to the world around them. I chose to paint the inside a darker color to represent the shadows that are hidden inside and that the people can not see the reality of what is happening to the world around them. 

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Perspective Strategies

The word perspective in Latin means "to look" or "through. In art, the meaning of perspective is a little different. In art perspective is the meaning of depth. Perspective is being able to take a two-dimensional object and creating a three-dimensional object on the two-dimensional object. Perspective is also a sense of viewpoint. Taking the artist's viewpoint and creating an image to project that viewpoint to the viewer in an interesting way. An interesting way, meaning a viewpoint that they do not necessarily view that object from eye level. 


Horizon Line: 
A horizon line or eye level line is the separation of the sky from the water or land. It is the height of the viewer's eyes when looking at the art. 

Vanishing Point:
The vanishing point is a point on the horizon line when the receding parallel lines start to diminish.

Orthogonal lines:
Orthogonal lines are straight diagonal lines that are drawn to connect points around the edges of a picture to the vanishing point. They help draw the viewer's eyes into the depth of the picture.

Transversal lines:
Transversal lines are lines that run parallel to the picture plane and perpendicular to the orthogonal lines. These lines establish a fixed height or width between two orthogonal lines